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20121226
20121226
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. ♪ >> we begin as president obama and the senate head back to washington set for one last effort to avert the first fiscal cliff. aloha means good-bye for the president as he packs bound for the white house tonight. the president cutting short his vacation leaving michelle and the girls behind as he gets back to work to try to prevent tax increases and spending cuts due to begin next week. there's just one problem. it appears there would be no house republicans to help hammer out a deal. the gop leadership has not yet called their members back to d.c. and will not be in session tomorrow for legislative business. according to one gop aide, they felt it's up to the democrats to act now. so the christmas spirit has not softened actions. but what has softened? customer confidence. in the last week gallup found the drop in the likelihood congress will come to a deal. also holiday spending hit its lowest rate since the 2008 recession. while the president said before he left for hawaii that he said he hoped the holiday would give them a chance to cool off and reach an agreement, it appears repub
falls in a barrel. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let's start with this. president obama and his republican opponents are about to go over niagra falls in a barrel, but nobody knows for shush how bad it's going to be. will the economy smash on the rocks below? will the stock market plunge a thousand points and keep on dropping? will the world money watchers see the u.s. drowning in its own dysfunction? or will obama and the dead-end opposition it faces be saved by the public's horribly low expectations of what they can do? what will prove stronger for obama and boehner? the barrels they're riding in or the power of niagra falls itself? joining me now is politico's jonathan ryan. how about an answer on that one? what's going to protect these guys more? the low expectations people have about them getting anything done or failing to do what they set out to do. they all set the deadline. they have the -- what do you call it. the stakes are clear, the payroll taxes, income taxes, you name it. they put it all together. and if they blow it, who
a deal on the fiscal cliff. however, chief white house correspondent ed henry tells us that washington may have to set with a backup plan to the backup plan. >> christmas tradition for president obama. he and first lady michelle obama saying thanks at the marine corps base hawaii. >> so many of you make sacrifices day in and day out on behalf of the freedom and behalf of the security. >> now the president is giving up some vacation time rushing back to washington aboard air force one late tonight to deal with the looming fiscal cliff. after that red eye, the president will no doubt need coffee. starbucks decided to get political in the washington, d.c., shops, by having employees write come together on cups. ceo howard schultz writing in open letter, "my hope is the simple message will serve as holiday reminder from starbuck of the spirit that bridgeed differences and we have the power to come together and make a difference in every season of the year." the president and speaker john boehner have not spoken in nearly a week. when the house republicans convene conference call today, all
see already, there is a different tone in washington. i think elections matter. the voters spoke. even though the race was relatively close, it was not that close in the electoral college. even the margin has expanded now to 4 million votes. i think people read those results. i think, for example, on an issue like immigration reform, the prospects for passing comprehensive immigration reform in the near future -- near future are much greater than they were three weeks ago because of the result of the election. i think the chance of coming to an agreement on this fiscal cliff are greater today because of this election. politicians read election results. i do not know whether our campaign or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candid
is really terrific is the bipartisan spirit. carol and i are going down to washington at a time with the hyper partisanship. people are really divided. what i really want to do is bring common sense, bring those granite state values. women have always worked in new hampshire, since the mills. look at new hampshire history, women have worked for generations. if you want something done, you ask a busy woman. look at the folks around this room. what i feel is we are not unique in this ability, but we do know how to bring people together to get things done. that is the most important quality that any of us could bring, certainly what governor elective hassan is going to face in the state. we all need to come to get there. men and women. our country needs our help. >> a great point. fill. you are the second woman governor in the state -- you feel a weight on your shoulders as a role model? >> i think all leaders want to do a really good job. i feel an enormous responsibility to serve the people of new hampshire as well as i can and leave the state a better place, even as good as it i
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
. right now we're doing very well in the state of washington. north dakota. excellent, now in nevada. and our people are in the right places and doing the things to become a delegate. it's way too soon to write anybody off. just because somebody is in second or third place, there's a race going on. what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> people have tried to portray you as a kind of ruthless money machine who some failed, some succeeded, you didn't care, you still got your fee, or you made a ton of money but actually quite a few of the companies that failed, a lot of people lost their jobs, their livelihoods and lost money. to me the key question is do you know instinctively from your recollections how many of those companies that you went into would have failed anyway if you hadn't? >> well, there's no question but that a number of places where we went in and invested, we were investing in an enterprise that was in trouble, that -- where the future was very much in doubt for it and we invested in one busy think it lost 50 or $60 or more million the year before we invested and
think that she is outside politics, outside of washington the way that people think of barack obama, which is a wholly new thing. that is sui generis. >> i don't see it like that especially because the man himself is an island unto himself in washington, d.c. >> yes. >> he is not a democratic party boss like tip o'neill. he's not even really connected with the chicago political machine. >> and curiously, people like that. >> he is his own man. that's a great thing unless you are the democrats that want this to be passed along four years from now. >> but is there, in your view, a philosophical way of being that is inheritable, to use rick's word? is this pragmatic problem-solving approach that clinton began and obama has clearly taken through this four years, five years so far, is the next republican victor going to have to be someone who is less ideological than, say, 30 years ago? >> well, i take exception with the suggestion that barack obama has been pragmatic. he passed a lot of things the first two years by running the democrats and getting their vote. i believe the great histo
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)